Antarctica 2010-11

Antarctic Actors

The great star actors of Antarctica are the penguins – in total 7 species could appear on stage.
The cast also contains the world's largest number of whales and seals, as well as other bird species like Antarctic terns, Antarctic shags & Cape Petrels.
Thrilling scenes are also provided by gigantic Humpback whales, hunting Orcas and fierce Leopard seals.

Antarctic stage setting

A masterpiece of the stage designer, the Antarctic stage is a dramatic composition of shining white and deep blue-colored icebergs and cathedral-like ice towers.
The huge Antarctic ice-cap produces gigantic tabular ice-bergs that are typical of the Southern Ocean.
Steep ice-covered mountain ridges with huge outlet glaciers abound, flowing like gigantic rivers.

Ship Details

Length : 89 meters ( 267 feet)
Breadth : 14,5 meters ( 43 feet)
Draft : 4.5 meters ( 15 feet)
Speed : 10 -12 knots
Capacity : 11- passengers
Nautical crew : 17
International expedition staff : 8
International Hotel & catering staff : 19
Emergency door :1

Antarctica ahoy!

Embark on a holiday to the continent that very few have stepped upon.
Travel in comfort, on m/v Plancius, an ice-breaker ship specially equipped for the polar regions

Close encounters

Explore the land on inflatable boats or 'Zodiacs' that take you on shore.
Discover the flora and fauna of Antarctica, guided by ornithologists, naturalists, historians, animal behavior specialists, botanists and diving specialists.

On the white continent

Grab an incredible opportunity to camp on Antarctica – in the midst of ancient ice.
Spend a night of profound silence under the glorious Antarctic sky

PLA21

2010-11 Falklands - South Georgia - Antarctic Peninsula
On our departure, PLA22, 22 November - 10 December 2010: A traditional American Thanksgiving dinner will be served on 25 November during this departure


Day 1 In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located in the shadow of the Andes and right at the Beagle Channel shore. We'll sail through this scenic waterway during the afternoon.

Day 2
At sea, in the wester lies the ship is followed by several species of albatrosses, storm petrels, shearwaters and diving petrels.

Day 3
A typical itinerary in the Falklands - South Georgia, and Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board. In the Falkland Islands (Malvinas) we plan to spend the whole day on the fascinating western side of the archipelago. A hike along the shore of Carcass Island will give us instead views of Magellanic and Gentoo-Penguins, as well as close encounters with water fowl and Night herons. In addition, on Saunders we will be able to observe Rockhopper Penguins, Black-browed Albatrosses and King Cormorants.

Day 4
In Stanley, the capital of the Falklands, we can experience Falkland culture, which has some South- American characteristics as well as Victorian charm. In Stanley and surrounding area we can see a quite important number of stranded clippers from a century ago.

Day 5 & 6
At sea, on our way to South Georgia we will cross the Antarctic Convergence. Entering Antarctic waters, the temperature will drop as much as 10 degrees C in the time span of only a few hours. Near the Convergence we will see a multitude of southern seabirds near the ship; several species of Albatrosses, Shearwaters, Petrels, Prions and Skuas.

Day 7 - 10
In South Georgia we shall visit the bay of Elsehul, with it´s very active fur seal breeding beach, and then take course to Right Whale Bay, Salisbury Plain, Gold Harbour and Cooper Bay to give you a good opportunity to see a wide spectrum of landscapes and wildlife, like the introduced Reindeer, Elephant seals, King and Macaroni Penguins. At Fortuna Bay we might try to follow in the footsteps of the great British Explorer Ernest Shackleton and hike over to Stømness Bay. There and at Grytviken we'll see and abandoned whaling village, where King Penguins now walk in the streets and seals have taken over the buildings. At Grytviken we´ll also offer a visit to the Whaling History Museum as well as to Shackleton´s grave near by. One of the highlights might be our visit to Prion Island, where we will witness the breeding efforts of the huge Wandering Albatross and enjoy watching their displays.

Day 11
At sea, where the ship is again followed by a multitude of seabirds. At some point we might encounter sea-ice, and it is at the ice-edge where we might have a chance to see some high-Antarctic species like the Maccormick Skua, Snow Petrel and the elusive Emperor Penguin.

Day 12
We are aiming for a visit at Orcadas station, an Argentinean base located in the South Orkney Islands. The friendly base personnel will show us their facilities and we can enjoy the wonderful views of the surrounding glaciers.

Day 13
At sea.

Day 14 - 16
We will sail into the Weddell Sea through the ice-clogged Antarctic Sound. Huge tabular icebergs will announce our arrival to the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. We plan to visit Paulet Island with a million pairs of Adelie Penguins and the remains of the Nordenskiöld expedition. At Brown Bluff we can put our feet on the continent. At Deception Island, we will try to land at Baily Head home to a colony of ten thousands of Chinstrap Penguins. Deception itself is a sub ducted crater, which opens into the sea, creating a natural harbour for the ship. Here we find hot springs, an abandoned whaling station, thousands of Cape Pigeons and many Dominican Gulls, Brown and South Polar Skuas and Antarctic Terns. Wilson's Storm Petrels and Black-bellied Storm Petrels nest in the ruins of the whaling station in Whalers Bay. Good walkers may hike from Baily Head over the ridge of the crater into Whalers Bay, while our ship braves its entrance into the crater through the spectacular Neptune's Bellow into the ring of Deception Island. In the afternoon we may land at Half Moon Island, where we can obsereve Elephant, Weddell and Fur Seals as well as Chinstrap Penguins, Blue-eyed Shags, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Kelp Gulls, Snowy Sheatbills, Antarctic Terns and Antarctic Brown Skuas. On our way West, we sail to Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula. It contains a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. Time and conditions allowing we hope to be able to sail further South to Neko Harbour in Andvord Bay and through Paradise Bay with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, while having chances of seeing large Whales. We will have opportunities for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords.

Day 17 - 18
On our way north we are again followed by a great selection of seabirds while crossing the Drake Passage.

Day 19
We arrive in the morning in Ushuaia and disembark.

PLA22

2010-11 Falklands - South Georgia - Antarctic Peninsula
On our departure, PLA22, 22 November - 10 December 2010: A traditional American Thanksgiving dinner will be served on 25 November during this departure


Day 1
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located in the shadow of the Andes and right at the Beagle Channel shore. We'll sail through this scenic waterway during the afternoon.

Day 2 At sea, in the wester lies the ship is followed by several species of albatrosses, storm petrels, shearwaters and diving petrels.

Day 3
A typical itinerary in the Falklands - South Georgia, and Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board.
In the Falkland Islands (Malvinas) we plan to spend the whole day on the fascinating western side of the archipelago. A hike along the shore of Carcass Island will give us instead views of Magellanic and Gentoo-Penguins, as well as close encounters with water fowl and Night herons. In addition, on Saunders we will be able to observe Rockhopper Penguins, Black-browed Albatrosses and King Cormorants.

Day 4
In Stanley, the capital of the Falklands, we can experience Falkland culture, which has some South- American characteristics as well as Victorian charm. In Stanley and surrounding area we can see a quite important number of stranded clippers from a century ago.

Day 5 & 6
At sea, on our way to South Georgia we will cross the Antarctic Convergence. Entering Antarctic waters, the temperature will drop as much as 10 degrees C in the time span of only a few hours. Near the Convergence we will see a multitude of southern seabirds near the ship; several species of Albatrosses, Shearwaters, Petrels, Prions and Skuas.

Day 7 - 10
In South Georgia we shall visit the bay of Elsehul, with it´s very active fur seal breeding beach, and then take course to Right Whale Bay, Salisbury Plain, Gold Harbour and Cooper Bay to give you a good opportunity to see a wide spectrum of landscapes and wildlife, like the introduced Reindeer, Elephant seals, King and Macaroni Penguins. At Fortuna Bay we might try to follow in the footsteps of the great British Explorer Ernest Shackleton and hike over to Stømness Bay. There and at Grytviken we'll see and abandoned whaling village, where King Penguins now walk in the streets and seals have taken over the buildings. At Grytviken we´ll also offer a visit to the Whaling History Museum as well as to Shackleton´s grave near by. One of the highlights might be our visit to Prion Island, where we will witness the breeding efforts of the huge Wandering Albatross and enjoy watching their displays.

Day 11
At sea, where the ship is again followed by a multitude of seabirds. At some point we might encounter sea-ice, and it is at the ice-edge where we might have a chance to see some high-Antarctic species like the Maccormick Skua, Snow Petrel and the elusive Emperor Penguin.

Day 12
We are aiming for a visit at Orcadas station, an Argentinean base located in the South Orkney Islands. The friendly base personnel will show us their facilities and we can enjoy the wonderful views of the surrounding glaciers.

Day 13
At sea.

Day 14 - 16
We will sail into the Weddell Sea through the ice-clogged Antarctic Sound. Huge tabular icebergs will announce our arrival to the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. We plan to visit Paulet Island with a million pairs of Adelie Penguins and the remains of the Nordenskiöld expedition. At Brown Bluff we can put our feet on the continent. At Deception Island, we will try to land at Baily Head home to a colony of ten thousands of Chinstrap Penguins. Deception itself is a sub ducted crater, which opens into the sea, creating a natural harbour for the ship. Here we find hot springs, an abandoned whaling station, thousands of Cape Pigeons and many Dominican Gulls, Brown and South Polar Skuas and Antarctic Terns. Wilson's Storm Petrels and Black-bellied Storm Petrels nest in the ruins of the whaling station in Whalers Bay. Good walkers may hike from Baily Head over the ridge of the crater into Whalers Bay, while our ship braves its entrance into the crater through the spectacular Neptune's Bellow into the ring of Deception Island. In the afternoon we may land at Half Moon Island, where we can obsereve Elephant, Weddell and Fur Seals as well as Chinstrap Penguins, Blue-eyed Shags, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Kelp Gulls, Snowy Sheatbills, Antarctic Terns and Antarctic Brown Skuas.
On our way West, we sail to Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula. It contains a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. Time and conditions allowing we hope to be able to sail further South to Neko Harbour in Andvord Bay and through Paradise Bay with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, while having chances of seeing large Whales. We will have opportunities for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords.

Day 17 - 18
On our way north we are again followed by a great selection of seabirds while crossing the Drake Passage.

Day 19
We arrive in the morning in Ushuaia and disembark.

PLA23

010-11 Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetlands
Day 1 In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located in the shadow of the Andes and right at the Beagle Channel shore. We'll sail through this scenic waterway during the afternoon.
Day 2 & 3
During these two days we sail across the Drake Passage. When we cross the Antarctic Convergence, we arrive in the circum-Antarctic up welling zone. In this area we may see Wandering Albatrosses, Grey Headed Albatrosses, Black- browed Albatrosses, Light- mantled Sooty Albatrosses, Cape Pigeons, Southern Fulmars, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Blue Petrels and Antarctic Petrels. Near the South Shetland Islands, we glimpse at the first icebergs.

Day 4 - 8
A typical itinerary in Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board. We will sail to Deception Island first and hope for a good long walk and kayak trip which will depend on site availability and weather conditions. We then sail through the Gerlache Strait to "High Antarctica", passing Brabant Islands. In Orne Harbour we hope to make a landing in order to walk the spectacular Spigot Peak. The surroundings are very alpine, the walk as such brings us up to approx 300 m above sea level. The views from the summit are fantastic. The kayakers have much time to do their near shore exploratory trips. On Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula and Danco Island, we will find a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. On Danco Island we can observe Chinstrap Penguins and possibly Weddell and Crabeater Seals. In Neko Harbour we will have the opportunity to set foot on the Antarctic Continent in a magnificent landscape of huge glaciers, other continent landings are for example possible on Portal Point . During the cruise we will also offer zodiac cruises such as near Foyn Harbour on Nansen Island and Neko Harbour.
When sailing to Paradise Bay, with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, we will have the opportunity for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords. In this area we have good chances to see Humpback Whales and Minke Whales. After sailing through the Neumayer Channel, we visit the British research station and post office Port Lockroy on Goudier Island. Close to Port Lockroy we can also offer a landing on Jougla Point with Gentoo Penguins and Imperial Shags.
We sail through the spectacular Lemaire Channel to Pleneau and Petermann Island where we can find Adelie Penguins and Blue-eyed Shags. In this area there are good chances to encounter Humpback Whales, Minke Whales and Fin Whales. A visit to one of the scientific stations in Antarctica will give you an insight about the life of modern Antarcticans working on the White Continent. Further south we may visit the Ukrainian Vernadsky Station, where we will receive a warm welcome from the station crew. Sailing north through Neumayer Channel we arrive at the Melchior Islands with a very beautiful landscape and again possibilities for zodiac cruising among the icebergs, where we may encounter Leopard Seals, Crabeater Seals and whales.

Day 9 - 10
In the Drake Passage we have again a chance of seeing many seabirds and to take advantage of the knowledge of our lecture team.

Day 11 We arrive in the morning in Ushuaia and disembark.

PLA24A 2010-11 Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetlands PLA24A, 20 - 29 December 2010: A Christmas Party including a Christmas dinner and presents under the tree will be provided during this departure

Day 1
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located in the shadow of the Andes and right at the Beagle Channel shore. We'll sail through this scenic waterway during the afternoon.

Day 2 & 3
During these two days we sail across the Drake Passage. When we cross the Antarctic Convergence, we arrive in the circum-Antarctic up welling zone. In this area we may see Wandering Albatrosses, Grey Headed Albatrosses, Black- browed Albatrosses, Light- mantled Sooty Albatrosses, Cape Pigeons, Southern Fulmars, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Blue Petrels and Antarctic Petrels. Near the South Shetland Islands, we glimpse at the first icebergs. The Master of the vessel may decide to sail the narrow English Strait between Robert Island and Greenwich Island if the conditions are favourable. Then we might be able to do our first landing in Antarctic waters in the late evening of the third day at Aitcho Island at the South Shetlands. If the conditions will not allow to manoeuvre through the English Strait then we continue sailing South of Livingston.
These volcanic islands or the South Shetlands are windswept and often shrouded in mist and fog, but do offer subtle pleasures. There is a nice variety of flora (mosses, lichens and flowering grasses) and fauna, such as Gentoo Penguins, Chinstrap Penguins and southern Giant Petrels.

Day 4 - 7
A typical itinerary in Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board.
We may start our first day with a landing on Half Moon Island, where we will find a variety of Chinstrap Penguins, Seals often haul out on the beach. Later on , we sail to Deception Island. Deception is a sub ducted crater, which opens into the sea, creating a natural harbour for the ship. Here we find hot springs, an abandoned whaling station, thousands of Cape Pigeons and many Dominican Gulls, Brown and South Polar Skuas and Antarctic Terns. Wilson's Storm Petrels and Black-bellied Storm Petrels nest in the ruins of the whaling station in Whalers Bay.
On our way further South we will sail across the Gerlache Strait to Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula and Danco Island. It contains a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. In Neko Harbour and Paradise Bay with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, we have the opportunity to set foot on the Antarctic Continent. We shall have the opportunity for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords. In this area we have good chances to see Humpback Whales and Minke Whales. We sail through the spectacular Lemaire Channel to Petermann Island offering Adelie Penguins and Blue-eyed Shags. We also try to land at Pleneau Island with Elephant Seals and fair chances to encounter Humpback, Minke and Fin Whales. A visit to one of the scientific stations in Antarctica will give you an insight about the life of modern Antarcticans working on the White Continent. Further south we may visit the Ukrainian Vernadsky Station, where we will receive a warm welcome from the station crew. Sailing north through Neumayer Channel we arrive at the Melchior Islands with a very beautiful landscape and again possibilities for zodiac cruising among the icebergs, where we may encounter Leopard Seals, Crabeater Seals and whales. In the Neumayer Channel, we may visit the British research station and post office Port Lockroy on Goudier Island. Close to Port Lockroy we can also offer a landing on Jougla Point with Gentoo Penguins and Imperial Shags.

Day 8 - 9
In the Drake Passage we have again a chance of seeing many seabirds and to take advantage of the knowledge of our lecture team.

Day 10
We arrive in the morning in Ushuaia and disembark.

PLA24B

2010-11 Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetlands
PLA24B, 29 December 2010 - 07 January 2011: A New Year's Celebration will be observed on 31 December during this departure

Day 1
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located in the shadow of the Andes and right at the Beagle Channel shore. We'll sail through this scenic waterway during the afternoon.

Day 2 & 3
During these two days we sail across the Drake Passage. When we cross the Antarctic Convergence, we arrive in the circum-Antarctic up welling zone. In this area we may see Wandering Albatrosses, Grey Headed Albatrosses, Black- browed Albatrosses, Light- mantled Sooty Albatrosses, Cape Pigeons, Southern Fulmars, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Blue Petrels and Antarctic Petrels. Near the South Shetland Islands, we glimpse at the first icebergs. The Master of the vessel may decide to sail the narrow English Strait between Robert Island and Greenwich Island if the conditions are favourable. Then we might be able to do our first landing in Antarctic waters in the late evening of the third day at Aitcho Island at the South Shetlands. If the conditions will not allow to manoeuvre through the English Strait then we continue sailing South of Livingston.
These volcanic islands or the South Shetlands are windswept and often shrouded in mist and fog, but do offer subtle pleasures. There is a nice variety of flora (mosses, lichens and flowering grasses) and fauna, such as Gentoo Penguins, Chinstrap Penguins and southern Giant Petrels.

Day 4 - 7
A typical itinerary in Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board.
We may start our first day with a landing on Half Moon Island, where we will find a variety of Chinstrap Penguins, Seals often haul out on the beach. Later on , we sail to Deception Island. Deception is a sub ducted crater, which opens into the sea, creating a natural harbour for the ship. Here we find hot springs, an abandoned whaling station, thousands of Cape Pigeons and many Dominican Gulls, Brown and South Polar Skuas and Antarctic Terns. Wilson's Storm Petrels and Black-bellied Storm Petrels nest in the ruins of the whaling station in Whalers Bay.
On our way further South we will sail across the Gerlache Strait to Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula and Danco Island. It contains a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. In Neko Harbour and Paradise Bay with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, we have the opportunity to set foot on the Antarctic Continent. We shall have the opportunity for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords. In this area we have good chances to see Humpback Whales and Minke Whales. We sail through the spectacular Lemaire Channel to Petermann Island offering Adelie Penguins and Blue-eyed Shags. We also try to land at Pleneau Island with Elephant Seals and fair chances to encounter Humpback, Minke and Fin Whales. A visit to one of the scientific stations in Antarctica will give you an insight about the life of modern Antarcticans working on the White Continent. Further south we may visit the Ukrainian Vernadsky Station, where we will receive a warm welcome from the station crew. Sailing north through Neumayer Channel we arrive at the Melchior Islands with a very beautiful landscape and again possibilities for zodiac cruising among the icebergs, where we may encounter Leopard Seals, Crabeater Seals and whales. In the Neumayer Channel, we may visit the British research station and post office Port Lockroy on Goudier Island. Close to Port Lockroy we can also offer a landing on Jougla Point with Gentoo Penguins and Imperial Shags.

Day 8 - 9
In the Drake Passage we have again a chance of seeing many seabirds and to take advantage of the knowledge of our lecture team.

Day 10
We arrive in the morning in Ushuaia and disembark.

PLA25

2010-11 Falklands - South Georgia - Antarctic Peninsula On our departure, PLA22, 22 November - 10 December 2010: A traditional American Thanksgiving dinner will be served on 25 November during this departure
Day 1
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located in the shadow of the Andes and right at the Beagle Channel shore. We'll sail through this scenic waterway during the afternoon.

Day 2
At sea, in the wester lies the ship is followed by several species of albatrosses, storm petrels, shearwaters and diving petrels.
Day 3
A typical itinerary in the Falklands - South Georgia, and Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board.
In the Falkland Islands (Malvinas) we plan to spend the whole day on the fascinating western side of the archipelago. A hike along the shore of Carcass Island will give us instead views of Magellanic and Gentoo-Penguins, as well as close encounters with water fowl and Night herons. In addition, on Saunders we will be able to observe Rockhopper Penguins, Black-browed Albatrosses and King Cormorants.

Day 4
In Stanley, the capital of the Falklands, we can experience Falkland culture, which has some South- American characteristics as well as Victorian charm. In Stanley and surrounding area we can see a quite important number of stranded clippers from a century ago.
Day 5 & 6
At sea, on our way to South Georgia we will cross the Antarctic Convergence. Entering Antarctic waters, the temperature will drop as much as 10 degrees C in the time span of only a few hours. Near the Convergence we will see a multitude of southern seabirds near the ship; several species of Albatrosses, Shearwaters, Petrels, Prions and Skuas.

Day 7 - 10
In South Georgia we shall visit the bay of Elsehul, with it´s very active fur seal breeding beach, and then take course to Right Whale Bay, Salisbury Plain, Gold Harbour and Cooper Bay to give you a good opportunity to see a wide spectrum of landscapes and wildlife, like the introduced Reindeer, Elephant seals, King and Macaroni Penguins. At Fortuna Bay we might try to follow in the footsteps of the great British Explorer Ernest Shackleton and hike over to Stømness Bay. There and at Grytviken we'll see and abandoned whaling village, where King Penguins now walk in the streets and seals have taken over the buildings. At Grytviken we´ll also offer a visit to the Whaling History Museum as well as to Shackleton´s grave near by. One of the highlights might be our visit to Prion Island, where we will witness the breeding efforts of the huge Wandering Albatross and enjoy watching their displays.

Day 11
At sea, where the ship is again followed by a multitude of seabirds. At some point we might encounter sea-ice, and it is at the ice-edge where we might have a chance to see some high-Antarctic species like the Maccormick Skua, Snow Petrel and the elusive Emperor Penguin.

Day 12
We are aiming for a visit at Orcadas station, an Argentinean base located in the South Orkney Islands. The friendly base personnel will show us their facilities and we can enjoy the wonderful views of the surrounding glaciers.
Day 13
At sea.

Day 14 - 16
We will sail into the Weddell Sea through the ice-clogged Antarctic Sound. Huge tabular icebergs will announce our arrival to the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. We plan to visit Paulet Island with a million pairs of Adelie Penguins and the remains of the Nordenskiöld expedition. At Brown Bluff we can put our feet on the continent.
At Deception Island, we will try to land at Baily Head home to a colony of ten thousands of Chinstrap Penguins. Deception itself is a sub ducted crater, which opens into the sea, creating a natural harbour for the ship. Here we find hot springs, an abandoned whaling station, thousands of Cape Pigeons and many Dominican Gulls, Brown and South Polar Skuas and Antarctic Terns. Wilson's Storm Petrels and Black-bellied Storm Petrels nest in the ruins of the whaling station in Whalers Bay. Good walkers may hike from Baily Head over the ridge of the crater into Whalers Bay, while our ship braves its entrance into the crater through the spectacular Neptune's Bellow into the ring of Deception Island. In the afternoon we may land at Half Moon Island, where we can obsereve Elephant, Weddell and Fur Seals as well as Chinstrap Penguins, Blue-eyed Shags, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Kelp Gulls, Snowy Sheatbills, Antarctic Terns and Antarctic Brown Skuas.
On our way West, we sail to Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula. It contains a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. Time and conditions allowing we hope to be able to sail further South to Neko Harbour in Andvord Bay and through Paradise Bay with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, while having chances of seeing large Whales. We will have opportunities for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords.

Day 17 - 18
On our way north we are again followed by a great selection of seabirds while crossing the Drake Passage.

Day 19
We arrive in the morning in Ushuaia and disembark.

PLA26

010-11 Antarctic Peninsula Day 1
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located in the shadow of the Andes and right at the Beagle Channel shore. We'll sail through this scenic waterway during the afternoon.

Day 2 & 3
During these two days we sail across the Drake Passage. When we cross the Antarctic Convergence, we arrive in the circum-Antarctic up welling zone. In this area we may see Wandering Albatrosses, Grey Headed Albatrosses, Black- browed Albatrosses, Light- mantled Sooty Albatrosses, Cape Pigeons, Southern Fulmars, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Blue Petrels and Antarctic Petrels. Near the South Shetland Islands, we glimpse at the first icebergs.

Day 4 - 8
A typical itinerary in Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board.
We will sail directly to "High Antarctica", passing the Melchior islands and the Schollaert Channel between Brabant and Anvers Island. On Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula and Danco Island, we will find a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. On Danco Island we can observe Chinstrap Penguins and possibly Weddell and Crabeater Seals. In Neko Harbour we will have the opportunity to set foot on the Antarctic Continent in a magnificent landscape of huge glaciers, other continent landings are for example possible on Portal Point .
During the cruise we will also offer zodiac cruises such as near Foyn Harbour on Nansen Island and Neko Harbour. When sailing to Paradise Bay, with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, we will have the opportunity for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords. In this area we have good chances to see Humpback Whales and Minke Whales. After sailing through the Neumayer Channel, we visit the British research station and post office Port Lockroy on Goudier Island. Close to Port Lockroy we can also offer a landing on Jougla Point with Gentoo Penguins and Imperial Shags.
We sail through the spectacular Lemaire Channel to Pleneau and Petermann Island where we can find Adelie Penguins and Blue-eyed Shags. In this area there are good chances to encounter Humpback Whales, Minke Whales and Fin Whales. A visit to one of the scientific stations in Antarctica will give you an insight about the life of modern Antarcticans working on the White Continent. Further south we may visit the Ukrainian Vernadsky Station, where we will receive a warm welcome from the station crew. Sailing north through Neumayer Channel we arrive at the Melchior Islands with a very beautiful landscape and again possibilities for zodiac cruising among the icebergs, where we may encounter Leopard Seals, Crabeater Seals and whales.

Day 9 - 10 In the Drake Passage we have again a chance of seeing many seabirds and to take advantage of the knowledge of our lecture team.

Day 11 We arrive in the morning in Ushuaia and disembark.

PLA27

2010-11 Falklands - South Georgia - Antarctic Peninsula
On our departure, PLA22, 22 November - 10 December 2010: A traditional American Thanksgiving dinner will be served on 25 November during this departure

Day 1
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located in the shadow of the Andes and right at the Beagle Channel shore. We'll sail through this scenic waterway during the afternoon.

Day 2
At sea, in the wester lies the ship is followed by several species of albatrosses, storm petrels, shearwaters and diving petrels.
Day 3
A typical itinerary in the Falklands - South Georgia, and Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board.
In the Falkland Islands (Malvinas) we plan to spend the whole day on the fascinating western side of the archipelago. A hike along the shore of Carcass Island will give us instead views of Magellanic and Gentoo-Penguins, as well as close encounters with water fowl and Night herons. In addition, on Saunders we will be able to observe Rockhopper Penguins, Black-browed Albatrosses and King Cormorants.

Day 4
In Stanley, the capital of the Falklands, we can experience Falkland culture, which has some South- American characteristics as well as Victorian charm.
In Stanley and surrounding area we can see a quite important number of stranded clippers from a century ago.

Day 5 & 6
At sea, on our way to South Georgia we will cross the Antarctic Convergence. Entering Antarctic waters, the temperature will drop as much as 10 degrees C in the time span of only a few hours. Near the Convergence we will see a multitude of southern seabirds near the ship; several species of Albatrosses, Shearwaters, Petrels, Prions and Skuas.

Day 7 - 10
In South Georgia we shall visit the bay of Elsehul, with it´s very active fur seal breeding beach, and then take course to Right Whale Bay, Salisbury Plain, Gold Harbour and Cooper Bay to give you a good opportunity to see a wide spectrum of landscapes and wildlife, like the introduced Reindeer, Elephant seals, King and Macaroni Penguins. At Fortuna Bay we might try to follow in the footsteps of the great British Explorer Ernest Shackleton and hike over to Stømness Bay. There and at Grytviken we'll see and abandoned whaling village, where King Penguins now walk in the streets and seals have taken over the buildings. At Grytviken we´ll also offer a visit to the Whaling History Museum as well as to Shackleton´s grave near by. One of the highlights might be our visit to Prion Island, where we will witness the breeding efforts of the huge Wandering Albatross and enjoy watching their displays.

Day 11
At sea, where the ship is again followed by a multitude of seabirds. At some point we might encounter sea-ice, and it is at the ice-edge where we might have a chance to see some high-Antarctic species like the Maccormick Skua, Snow Petrel and the elusive Emperor Penguin.

Day 12
We are aiming for a visit at Orcadas station, an Argentinean base located in the South Orkney Islands. The friendly base personnel will show us their facilities and we can enjoy the wonderful views of the surrounding glaciers.

Day 13
At sea.
Day 14 - 16
We will sail into the Weddell Sea through the ice-clogged Antarctic Sound. Huge tabular icebergs will announce our arrival to the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. We plan to visit Paulet Island with a million pairs of Adelie Penguins and the remains of the Nordenskiöld expedition. At Brown Bluff we can put our feet on the continent.
At Deception Island, we will try to land at Baily Head home to a colony of ten thousands of Chinstrap Penguins. Deception itself is a sub ducted crater, which opens into the sea, creating a natural harbour for the ship. Here we find hot springs, an abandoned whaling station, thousands of Cape Pigeons and many Dominican Gulls, Brown and South Polar Skuas and Antarctic Terns. Wilson's Storm Petrels and Black-bellied Storm Petrels nest in the ruins of the whaling station in Whalers Bay. Good walkers may hike from Baily Head over the ridge of the crater into Whalers Bay, while our ship braves its entrance into the crater through the spectacular Neptune's Bellow into the ring of Deception Island. In the afternoon we may land at Half Moon Island, where we can obsereve Elephant, Weddell and Fur Seals as well as Chinstrap Penguins, Blue-eyed Shags, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Kelp Gulls, Snowy Sheatbills, Antarctic Terns and Antarctic Brown Skuas.
On our way West, we sail to Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula. It contains a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. Time and conditions allowing we hope to be able to sail further South to Neko Harbour in Andvord Bay and through Paradise Bay with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, while having chances of seeing large Whales. We will have opportunities for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords.

Day 17 - 18
On our way north we are again followed by a great selection of seabirds while crossing the Drake Passage.

Day 19
We arrive in the morning in Ushuaia and disembark.

PLA28

2010-11 Antarctic Peninsula
Day 1
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located in the shadow of the Andes and right at the Beagle Channel shore. We'll sail through this scenic waterway during the afternoon.


Day 2 & 3
During these two days we sail across the Drake Passage. When we cross the Antarctic Convergence, we arrive in the circum-Antarctic up welling zone. In this area we may see Wandering Albatrosses, Grey Headed Albatrosses, Black- browed Albatrosses, Light- mantled Sooty Albatrosses, Cape Pigeons, Southern Fulmars, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Blue Petrels and Antarctic Petrels. Near the South Shetland Islands, we glimpse at the first icebergs.

Day 4 - 8
A typical itinerary in Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board.
We will sail directly to "High Antarctica", passing the Melchior islands and the Schollaert Channel between Brabant and Anvers Island. On Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula and Danco Island, we will find a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. On Danco Island we can observe Chinstrap Penguins and possibly Weddell and Crabeater Seals. In Neko Harbour we will have the opportunity to set foot on the Antarctic Continent in a magnificent landscape of huge glaciers, other continent landings are for example possible on Portal Point .
During the cruise we will also offer zodiac cruises such as near Foyn Harbour on Nansen Island and Neko Harbour.
When sailing to Paradise Bay, with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, we will have the opportunity for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords. In this area we have good chances to see Humpback Whales and Minke Whales. After sailing through the Neumayer Channel, we visit the British research station and post office Port Lockroy on Goudier Island. Close to Port Lockroy we can also offer a landing on Jougla Point with Gentoo Penguins and Imperial Shags.
We sail through the spectacular Lemaire Channel to Pleneau and Petermann Island where we can find Adelie Penguins and Blue-eyed Shags. In this area there are good chances to encounter Humpback Whales, Minke Whales and Fin Whales. A visit to one of the scientific stations in Antarctica will give you an insight about the life of modern Antarcticans working on the White Continent. Further south we may visit the Ukrainian Vernadsky Station, where we will receive a warm welcome from the station crew. Sailing north through Neumayer Channel we arrive at the Melchior Islands with a very beautiful landscape and again possibilities for zodiac cruising among the icebergs, where we may encounter Leopard Seals, Crabeater Seals and whales.

Day 9 - 10
In the Drake Passage we have again a chance of seeing many seabirds and to take advantage of the knowledge of our lecture team.

Day 11
We arrive in the morning in Ushuaia and disembark.

PLA29

2010-11 Weddell Sea and Antarctic Peninsula - Basecamp Plancius
Day 1 In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located at the Beagle Channel and sail through this scenic waterway for the rest of the evening.

Day 2 & 3
During these two days we will sail across the Drake Passage. When we cross the Antarctic Convergence, we arrive in the circum-Antarctic up welling zone. In this area we may meet Wandering Albatrosses, Grey Headed Albatrosses, Black-browed Albatrosses, Light-mantled Sooty Albatrosses, Cape Pigeons, Southern Fulmars, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Blue Petrels and Antarctic Petrels. If the winds are favourable we might enter Antarctic waters in the evening of the third day near the South Shetlands.
These volcanic islands are windswept and often shrouded in mist and fog, but do offer subtle pleasures. There is a nice variety of flora (mosses, lichens and flowering grasses) and fauna, such as Gentoo Penguins, Chinstrap Penguins and southern Giant Petrels.

Day 4 – 5
A typical itinerary in the Weddell Sea and Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board.
We will sail into the Weddell Sea through the ice-clogged Antarctic Sound. Huge tabular icebergs will announce our arrival to the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. We plan to visit Devil Island and Vega Island with a large colony of Adelie Penguins and a magnificent view for those hikers who can make it to the top of the hill. Melting ice sometimes provides spectacular waterfall from the cliffs close to point 'Well-Met'. The protected waters around Herbert Sound at the North side of James Ross Island will become our "Basecamp" for all activities. This place is hardly visited by other ships and offers us a great opportunity to scout this region first time on foot, per zodiac, during photo excursions and kayak trips. We plan to stay two overnights at anchor in order to implement two camp nights and one full day activity from Basecamp at either Uru Pensinsula on James Ross Island or Vega Island. If we cannot follow our itinerary into Herbert Sound due to sea ice, we can continue our voyage to seek for new camping grounds somewhere else. Exploring the unknown - this is true expeditioning!

Day 6
In the morning, after we brought the shore campers back to the ship, we will set sail to Paulet Island. Weather and conditions permitting we will land on this remote island to see the remains of the Nordenskiöld expedition and thousands of Adelie penguins. We might also have time to visit Brown Bluff in order to make a continental landing at the Northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. During hours at sea watch out for stray Emperor penguins. There might be a chance to see one on an ice-floe. If the sea is calm at Brown Bluff there is opportunity to kayak and walk along the shore line. We continue sailing through the Antarctic Sound to the West side of the Antarctic Peninsula along the Davis Coast.

Day 7
We will sail along the Wright Ice Piedmont at the Antarctic continent, named after the brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright who made the first flight with a plane in 1903. Exploration of Roe Island, an island lying in the entrance of the Curtiss Bay just about 2 miles west of Graham Land (Antarctic continent), named after the British pioneer aircraft designer Alliott Verdon-Roe, who made aircrafts since 1908. Seaplane Point is situated a few miles of Roe Island at the Antarctic continent. It was named in association with Curtiss Bay, after Glenn Curtiss, the American engineer who pioneered sea planes from 1911.

Day 8
We hope to sail to Neko Harbour and Paradise Bay to reach the southernmost area of our voyage, where we have again the opportunity to set foot on the Antarctic Continent in a magnificent landscape of huge glaciers. In this area we have good chances to see Humpback Whales and Minke Whales. Conditions permitting we will seek for a place to erect our tents for a camp night ashore.

Day 9
We will sail via the Melchior Islands towards the open sea of the Drake Passage. We have again a chance of seeing many seabirds.

Day 10 & 11
At sea .

Day 12
We arrive in the morning and disembark in Ushuaia

PLA30

2010-11 Polar Circle & Antarctic Peninsula
Day 1
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia and sail through the Beagle Channel.

Day 2 & 3
During these two days we will sail across the Drake Passage. When we cross the Antarctic Convergence, we arrive in the circum-Antarctic up welling zone. In this area we may meet Wandering Albatrosses, Grey Headed Albatrosses, Black-browed Albatrosses, Light-mantled Sooty Albatrosses, Cape Pigeons, Southern Fulmars, Wilson's Storm Petrels, Blue Petrels and Antarctic Petrels.
If the winds are favourable we might do our first landing in Antarctic waters in the evening of the third day at Aitcho Island or Penguin Island at the South Shetlands.
These volcanic islands are windswept and often shrouded in mist and fog, but do offer subtle pleasures. There is a nice variety of flora (mosses, lichens and flowering grasses) and fauna, such as Gentoo Penguins, Chinstrap Penguins and southern Giant Petrels.

Day 4 - 9
A typical itinerary in the Polar Circle and Antarctic Peninsula could be as follows. This is a sample only, the final itinerary will be determined by the Expedition Leader on board. Special note: At the end of the summer most penguins leave their nesting grounds, the chicks are grown up and explore their surroundings. It is a good season to sail across the Antarctic Circle and to spot whales, fur seals and leopard seals. We may start our first day in Antarctica with a landing at Hannah Point, where we will find a nice variety of Gentoo Penguins, Chinstraps and southern Giant Petrels, as well as Elephant Seals hauling out on the beach.
At Deception Island, we will try to land. Deception itself is a sub ducted crater, which opens into the sea, creating a natural harbour for the ship. Here we find hot springs, an abandoned whaling station, thousands of Cape Pigeons and many Dominican Gulls, Brown and South Polar Skuas and Antarctic Terns. Wilson's Storm Petrels and Black-bellied Storm Petrels nest in the ruins of the whaling station in Whalers Bay. Good walkers may hike from Baily Head over the ridge of the crater into Whalers Bay, while our ship braves its entrance into the crater through the spectacular Neptune's Bellow into the ring of Deception Island. On our way further South we will sail to Orne Islands with large colonies of Chinstrap Penguins and a beautiful view across the Gerlache Strait or to Cuverville Island, a small precipitous island, nestled between the mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula and Danco Island. It contains a large colony of Gentoo Penguins and breeding pairs of Brown Skuas. In Neko Harbour and Paradise Bay with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, we have the opportunity to set foot on the Antarctic Continent. We shall have the opportunity for zodiac cruising between the icebergs in the inner parts of the fjords.
We sail through the spectacular Lemaire Channel to Petermann Island offering Adelie Penguins and Blue-eyed Shags. We also try to land at Pleneau Island with Elephant Seals and fair chances to encounter Humpback, Minke and Fin Whales. We head south along the Argentine Islands to Crystal Sound, south of the polar circle. The landscape is very impressive with very high mountains and huge glaciers. At the Fish Islands we land at one of the southernmost Adelie Penguin and Blue-eyed Shag colonies in the Antarctic Peninsula.
A base visit will also be provided, to give you an insight about the life of modern Antarcticans working on the White Continent. At Detaille Island, south of the Polar Circle, in Crystal Sound we reach probably our farthest south. Sailing north again through Neumayer Channel and Gerlache Strait, we arrive at the Melchior Islands with a very beautiful landscape and again possibilities for zodiac cruising among the icebergs, where we may encounter Leopard Seals, Crabeater Seals and whales.

Day 10 & 11
In the Drake Passage we have again a chance of seeing many seabirds.

Day 12
We arrive in the morning and disembark in Ushuaia.

PLA31

2010-11 Atlantic Odyssey (Ushuaia - Ascension Isl.)
Day 1 (March 26)
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia and sail through the Beagle Channel.

Day 2 & 3
In the Drake Passage we witness a multitude of Albatrosses, Petrels and Fulmars.

Day 4
At Hope Bay and Brown Bluff we hope to set foot on the Antarctic Continent. In this area chances are good for encounters with Gentoo Penguins, Weddell Seals, Leopard Seals and Orcas. On some ice floes we could also be lucky to see a juvenile emperor penguin.

Day 5
If the sea ice conditions allow we will try and reach Devil and/or Paulet Island at the tip of the Weddell Sea, with its many huge table icebergs coming from the Larsen Ice Shelf. We will climb a hill with a gently slope from where we have a great view on the surroundings. At Paulet Island we will observe the last individuals of a large Adelie Penguin colony near the ruins of the Nordenskiöld Expedition from the beginning of the 20th century.

Day 6
At sea, we will sail towards the South Orkney Islands. Our exact navigational course will be determined by the prevailing ice conditions, in terms of both extent of sea ice and density of icebergs, which vary from year to year.

Day 7
On our way north we plan to visit South Orkneys, where the Scotsman Bruce once wintered and where we now may visit the friendly people of an Argentinean base.

Day 8
At sea, on our way to South Georgia, we witness a multitude of Albatrosses, Petrels and Fulmars.

Day 9 – 11
In South Georgia we will pay visits to the abandoned whaling settlements Grytviken, where now the penguins walk through the streets, and King Edwards Point with the grave of Shackleton. We will walk near the big King Penguin colony on Salisbury Plain and the breeding Wandering Albatrosses on Prion Island in the Bay of Isles. The last day in South Georgia we will spend in Cooper Bay where we will observe Chinstrap Penguins and Macaroni Penguins and breeding Light-mantled Sooty Albatrosses. Later we intend to sail to Gold Harbour to visit another King Penguin colony and to see many Elephant Seals and Fur Seals. It is a good area for long walks. We conclude our visit with zodiac excursions in the magnificent Drygalski Fjord and Larsen Harbour.

Day 12 - 16
In the westerlies we have a pleasant tailwind. On both sides of the Antarctic Convergence, we observe many species and great numbers of Antarctic and sub-Antarctic seabirds.

Day 17
Today we plan to approach the unique Gough Island for zodiac cruising around the island, as always weather permitting. In previous years we managed to circumnavigate all but four miles of the 33 mile circumference of the island in the ship, saw spectacular scenery and an unprecedented abundance of wildlife. We felt very privileged to be among the few visitors who have been able to experience Gough and in particular, to see it at such close quarters and in such favourable conditions. We hope to be lucky to repeat this unique experience with you.

Day 18 – 20
In the Tristan da Cunha archipelago we aim to call at the settlement at the west side of the main island. We will also try to make landings at Nightingale Island with millions of seabirds ranging from Yellow-nosed Albatrosses to Brown Noddies. We allow one day in reserve for bad weather. Please note that we will try and approach for landings, however due to the weather conditions this is not always possible.

Day 21 - 24
At sea, we now enter sub-tropical waters with their own brand of seabirds and dolphins.

Day 25 - 27
St. Helena has a good anchorage and landing site. On this island, we will have ample opportunities to enjoy local culture, pleasant climate, and endemic plants and birds. We will visit the place where Napoleon lived in exile. There will be opportunities to explore the Island on your own and for snorkelling, in the shallow surf near a wreck we can find a lot of fishes.

Day 28 - 29
At sea.

Day 30 – 31
Ascension Island is a dry volcanic island with a moist and richly vegetated top. The Sooty Tern (wide-awake) colony sometimes consists of more than 1 million breeding pairs. We will try to climb the moist summit of Ascension Island and make a zodiac-cruise around Boatswain Bird Island offering also great opportunities for snorkelling. We may witness egg-laying sea turtles coming ashore at night. Some of our passengers may disembark and fly with the scheduled RAF (Royal Air Force) flight to Brize Norton in Oxfordshire, UK. Others may proceed their voyage to Cape Verdes.

PLA32

2010-11 Atlantic Odyssey (Ascension Isl.- Praia, Cape Verdes )
Day 1 (April 25)
In the evening the vessel will depart from Ascension Island.

Day 2 - 6
At sea, we witness the northbound spring migration of northern birds like Arctic Terns and Long-tailed Skuas join us to cross the Equator ("the Line").

Day 7
We land at Fogo. This is the great vulcanological laboratory of the Cape Verde Islands. Here we shall see lava as fresh as is possible because it emerged from the ground within the last 10 years and with the dry atmosphere of the islands there is little weathering to take place. We shall land a short distance from the capital, Sao Felipe and shall take an excursion into the very crater to the village of Portela where the people, unbelievable as it seems, make wine. This is perhaps not, one of the greatest vintages of the world but it deserves tasting because of its curiosity. On returning to Sao Felipe we shall relax for a while before re-embarking for an early dinner after which we shall try an evening zodiac cruise in order to see the sea birds before dark.

Day 8
Praia on Sao Tiago, the main island of the southern group, has a character of its own. We shall make an excursion to Cidade Velha, steeped in history, and shall observe the massive fortress on the hill, built to deter English marauders in the period when the Crowns of Portugal and Spain were united and Portuguese possessions became as fair game to the likes of Drake and Raleigh as were Spanish ones. We shall see the ruins of the Cathedral, the oldest Christian Church in the tropics, and the slave whipping post in the main square. The village is well watered and there are plantations of sugar cane, which support a rum distillery, and several species of birds. We shall have another guided stroll around the City of Praia, which is the capital of the Cape Verdes, and which has given rise to a unique variety of folk music, which we shall hear as we pass the various bars!
Shortly after midnight we fly to Lisboa in Portugal (not included in the cruise rate).
Passengers can also disembark in Praia, evening Day 8 and stay for a day or more in a hotel in Praia and take a later flight to Lisboa.



Code Voyage Start Finish Duration Rate as per pax
PLA 23 Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetlands 07/12/2010 21/12/2010 14 nights / 15 days 39,333 QR
PLA 24 A Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetlands 17/12/2010 30/12/2010 13 nights / 14 days 39,333 QR
PLA 24 b Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetlands 26/12/2010 08/01/2011 13 nights / 14 days 39,333 QR
PLA 26 Antarctic Peninsula 22/10/2011 06/01/2011 14 nights / 15 days 43,333 QR
PLA 28 Antarctic Peninsula 19/02/2011 05/03/2011 14 nights / 15 days 43,333 QR
PLA 29 Weddell Sea and Antarctic Peninsula - Basecamp Plancius 01/03/2011 16/03/2011 15 nights / 16 days 43,333 QR
PLA 30 Polar Circle & Antarctic Peninsula 12/03/2011 27/03/2011 15 nights / 16 days 43,333 QR


General information for passengers

• Field camping option will be offered on all Plancius voyages in Antarctica 09/10
• Everyone can participate, no previous experience required
• Maximum number is limited to 15 persons per night
• Once in a lifetime, intensive Antarctic experience!
• The camping is assisted by expert field guides
• Equipment provided (bivouac & sleeping bag, mats, tents)
• Field camping is subject to weather, local site and environmental regulations
• 1 night has to be booked prior to trip, any extra night can be arranged onboard
• Supplement: Please see our dates & rates for the camping supplement

Oceanwide Expeditions offers on all Antarctic 2009/10, m/v Plancius departures, an exciting 'open air' camping option, providing an intensive experience of the Antarctic wilderness. Oceanwide Expeditions will provide special gear and field equipment which includes top quality wind and waterproof breathable bivouac bags (lightweight alternative to tent system). Tents for those that prefer a little bit more comfort will also be brought ashore. Polar sleeping bags will keep campers dry, warm and comfortable during the night in the open air of Antarctica. The night ashore will be supervised by one experienced field guide. Please note that camping is always subject to weather, local site and environmental regulations.

Field Camping in Antarctica
We aim at least one night out on each trip but the expedition team will offer more camping occasions when possible. Additional nights ashore are weather and site permitting and can only be offered at times that there is a possibility for the vessel to stay close enough to the shore during the night. When the vessel is relocating during the night camping is not possible.
According to international regulations we are not allowed to take stoves, fuel nor food ashore – with the exception of emergency rations and survival gear, drinking water and medical supplies. The camping group will be taken ashore after dinner, and returns to the ship just before breakfast. This means we will have the night hours ashore. On shore a camp will be made in a place where wildlife will not be disturbed. All campers will be equipped with a personal waterproof bag containing a sleeping mattress, a polar synthetic sleeping bag with inner liner and a breathable bivouac
bag. Besides these personal items other equipment such as tents will be taken ashore. In favourable weather conditions, campers have the possibility to sleep in the bivouac bag under the open sky. For those that find a bivy-bag a bit too spartan, and when the weather is not pleasant enough for the bivy-bag, tents are provided. Our sturdy dome tents will sleep 3 persons. While the field party is ashore, our staff will be in full radio contact with the ship. Staff will also stay ashore to assist and supervise the campers. Upon departure everything that was carried ashore must be returned to the ship. Field staff will ensure that the field camps are cleaned properly after each night's camp.

FAQ ( Frequently Asked Questions )

Is it possible to take food?
Eating food / snacks on shore is not allowed (Antarctic Treaty/ IAATO regulations) in order to prevent the spreading of diseases and seeds of alien plant species.

Is there a possibility to go to the toilet?
Toilet visits should be avoided on land (Antarctic Treaty/ IAATO regulations). Campers are encouraged to use the toilet facilities on board, prior to the camping. A portable toilet facility will be available ashore though. All solid waste has to be returned to the ship. It is advisable is that campers bring an individual "pee bottle" (e.g. wide opening plastic Nalgene bottle) for use during the night in order to avoid the use of the portable toilet.

How long do we stay ashore and where?
We offer near shore camping on the continent and/or Islands (depending on itinerary, weather and site regulations). Groups will stay up to a maximum 10 hours ashore.

Any prior experience required?
No, everyone can participate in this activity. There are no physical requirements except giving helping hands to field staff putting up tents and cleaning the campsite. Please note that we are not camping on a camping ground, we are in Antarctica! There can be rocks, snow, mud or a frozen hard surface. We expect from our campers to participate in erecting and preparing the camp site and also breaking up camp next morning. All camping equipment, most particularly tent bases and mats, must be cleaned thoroughly after each use ashore. The weather can also make the operation difficult.

What are the weather conditions?
Around the coasts of Antarctica, temperatures are generally close to freezing in the summer (December-February) months, or even slightly positive in the northern part of the Antarctic Peninsula. The temperatures in Antarctica vary between about -5 and 8 °C. Together with a strong wind these low temperatures feel like real sub-zero temperatures. This is caused by the wind-chill factor. Warm and efficient clothing (and a flexible attitude) are the best means to overcome these sometimes harsh circumstances.

Clothing

As conditions can change rapidly, make sure you have clothing and equipment suitable for the worst weather.

Important personal clothing and gear to bring (required): • thermal underwear
• fleece vest or jacket
• down jacket
• warm hat
• turtle neck (neck gaitor)
• thermal under gloves (fleece finger gloves)
• warm gloves (mittens)
• thick socks (plus spare socks)
• good sunglasses
• sun cream / sun block
• breathable (eg. Gore-Tex®) jacket and trousers
• "pee" bottle for Antarctica, e.g. wide opening Nalgene bottle (there are special ones for ladies in outdoor shops
available)

The following items will be provided by Oceanwide Expeditions:
• warm, insulated waterproof rubber boots
• bivouac bag (one per person)
• mattresses
• polar sleeping bag with inner liner
• portable field toilet (one per group_
• tents (1 tent per 3 persons)
• waterproof bag

Please note...
Cotton clothing like normal t-shirts and jeans are not advisable as cotton tends to get wet and stay wet while moving in a cold environment. Use thermal underwear.
Exploring remote and wild regions like Antarctica requires a sensible and flexible approach. Although there can be bright skies with sunshine the weather is unpredictable. Catabatic winds, caused by the icecaps and glaciers, can pick up suddenly and are a fierce opponent for polar travellers. This might lead to the cancellation of planned camp nights as field camping can and will only take place in safe weather conditions.

Minimum / maximum participant number:
1 person minimum / 15 persons maximum + 1 field guide

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